06 Nights 07 Days / Him Ka Aanchal With Delhi

Package Price

Rate: Rs. 14899 / Person

Destination :

Delhi Shimla Manali Delhi

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Your tour itinerary:

Day 01:  Home - Delhi - Shimla                           

Arriving at the Delhi / Chandigarh airport, you will meet our representative. He shall assist you on the tour and later on walk you to your chauffer, who will be driving you through rest of the tour. You will be driven to Shimla then. The night is to be spent at the hotel. You may check in anytime depending when you reach Shimla overnight stay at the hotel.

Day 02 | Shimla - City Tour

Morning after breakfast at hotel proceed for a full day local tour of Shimla .Shimla is a very popular holiday-retreat during the summer months It is also a famous holiday spot for honeymoon drive to Kufri visit Kufri -Winter Sports Capital, Himalayan Zoo afternoon local tour of Shimla includes Jakhu Temple, Chadwick Falls, Jakhoo Hill, Dorje Drag Monastery, Christ Church, Lower Bazaar evening shopping at The Mall street and overnight stay at Shimla.

Day 03 | Shimla - Manali               /      (250 KM 6 h 30 m drive)

After morning breakfast drive to Manali. On the way you can also visit Pandoh dam, The Pandoh Dam is an embankment dam on the Beas River in Mandi districtof Himachal Pradesh, India. Under the Beas Project, the dam was completed in 1977 and its primary purpose is hydroelectric power generation. Part of arun-of-the-river power scheme, it diverts the waters of the Beas to the southwest through a 38 km (24 mi) long system of tunnels and channels. The water is used for power generation at the Dehar Power House before being discharged into the Sutlej River, connecting both rivers. The power house has an installed capacity of 990 MW. The system diverts 256 cumecs (9000 cusecs) of Beas waters to the Satluj River. The project was completed in 1977. And Pass by beautiful Kullu valley, Beas River, Dashehra maidan etc. Arrive and check in at hotel. Evening free to explore Manali. Overnight stay in Manali.

Day 04 | Manali - City Tour

After breakfast at the hotel proceed to full day city tour of Manali visiting Hadimba Temple, Club House, Van Vihar, Manu Temple, Vashisht Temple and Tibetan Monastery. Evening free for your own activities or you can also go on mall road of Manali. Overnight stay at Manali.

Day 05 | Manali - Rohtang Pass - Manali           /            (50 KM one way 2 h 30 m drive)

After having breakfast, you need to take a slip to Rohtang pass {Rohtang pass at your own cost}. Sports lovers will be delighted here as Snow Skiing can be found there. That is all for the day. You can also visit on the way to Rohtang Pass , Gulaba Fall, Marhi, and Solang Valley, come back to hotel for overnight stay.  

Day 06 | Manali - Delhi      

In the morning after breakfast you will be free for your own activities and shopping after that check-out from the hotel and we will assist you in your transfer to New Delhi, reached Delhi check in at the hotel overnight stay at the hotel.

Day 07 | Delhi - City Tour & fly back to Home

After breakfast at the hotel get ready for visit Delhi city tour like India gate, Jama Masjid, Red Fort, Purana Qila, Qutub Minar and Lotus Temple etc. And check-out from the hotel & transfer to the New Delhi airport for back to home with sweet memories with Guruji Travel of India.  

  ***Tour Ends***

Inclusions

  •  Airport assistance on arrival. 
  • Accommodation as Double Occupancy rooms. 
  • Daily two mineral water bottle for each Guest in the car. 
  • Daily News paper in the car. 
  • Daily breakfast and dinner at the hotel. ( 6 Dinner and 6 Breakfast )
  • Intercity transfers and sightseeing by air conditioned chauffer driven car (Deluxe A/C Toyota Etios / Dezire car). 
  • Toll taxes, parking, driver charge and fuel. 
  • All applicable Government taxes.

Exclusions:

  •  Extras at the hotel. 
  •  Meals other then Itinerary. 
  • Monument entry fees. 
  • Personal Purchase. 
  • Any Tip.

Hotel

City Name Hotel Name Hotel Type

About The Place

About Shimla

Shimla, also known as Simla, is the largest city and one of the two capitals and of the northern Indian state of Himachal Pradesh, Dharamsala being the other capital. Shimla is also a district which is bounded by Mandi and Kullu in the north, Kinnaur in the east, the state of Uttarakhand in the south-east, and Solan and Sirmaur. In 1864, Shimla was declared as the summer capital of British India, succeeding Murree, northeast of Rawalpindi. After independence, the city became the capital of Punjab and was later named the capital of Himachal Pradesh. It is the principal commercial, cultural and educational centre of the hilly regions of the state. As of 2011, the city had 171,817 permanent residents, and was one of the least populous capital cities in India. Small hamlets were recorded prior to 1815 when British forces took control of the area. The climatic conditions attracted the British to establish the city in the dense forests of Himalayas. As the summer capital, Shimla hosted many important political meetings including the Simla Accord of 1914 and the Simla Conference of 1945. After independence, the state of Himachal Pradesh came into being in 1948 as a result of integration of 28 princely states. Even after independence, the city remained an important political centre, hosting the Simla Agreement of 1972. After the reorganisation, the Mahasu district and its major portion were merged with Shimla. Its name is derived from the goddess Shyamala Devi, an incarnation of the Hindu goddess. As of 2011 Shimla comprises 19 hill states, namely Baghal, Baghat, Balsan, Bashahr, Bhajji, Bija, Darkoti, Dhami, Jubbal, Keonthal, Kumharsain, Kunihar, Kuthar, Mahlog, Mangal, Nalagarh (Hindur), Sangri and Tharoch. Shimla is home to a number of buildings that are styled in the Tudorbethan and neo-Gothic architectures dating from the colonial era, as well as multiple temples and churches. The colonial architecture and churches, the temples and the natural beauty of the city attract a large number of tourists. The major attractions include the Viceroy Lodge, the Christ Church, the Jakhoo Temple, the Mall Road and the Ridge, which together form the city centre. The Kalka–Shimla Railway line built by the British, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is also a major tourist attraction. Owing to its steep terrain, Shimla hosts the mountain biking race MTB Himalaya, which started in 2005 and is regarded as the biggest event of its kind in South Asia. Shimla also has the largest natural ice skating rink in South Asia. Apart from being a tourism centre, the city is also an educational hub with a number of colleges and research institutions.

About Pondoh Dam

The two major rivers Beas and Satluj flow out of the himalayas and reach a point where they are separated by a crow fly distance of approximately 36 km and have an elevation difference of approximately 1099 ft. The waters of Beas are continuous flow from ice-melt and flow throughout the year. This was realized and a plan made to exploit the potential of this river system. The power potential was estimated as 1,000 MW. The plans originally called Beas Project Unit - I Beas Satluj Link Project went through several revisions for diverting the waters of Beas river. The first plan prepared by Punjab Irrigation Department in 1957. The 1957 plan contemplated a diversion dam at Pandoh, 11.26-kilometre (7.00 mi) tunnel, 19.31-kilometre (12.00 mi) open channel, 4.82-kilometre (3.00 mi) tunnel. The 1957 report was followed by a 1960 report and the final proposal in 1961. The final proposal included 76.25-metre (250.2 ft) diversion dam at Pandoh, a 7.62-metre (25.0 ft) dia, 13.11-kilometre (8.15 mi) Pandoh baggi tunnel, 11.8-kilometre (7.3 mi) Sunder Nagar hydel channel, 8.53-metre (28.0 ft) dia, 12.35-kilometre (7.67 mi) Sundernagar Satluj tunnel, 22.86-metre (75.0 ft) dia 125-metre (410 ft) high surge shaft, three Dehar penstocks split to six penstocks and Dehar power plant with 6 x 165 MW generators. The system would divert 9,000 cubic feet per second (250 m3/s) of the Beas to the Satluj. An added benefit of the project was the increased inflow to Gobind Sagar thereby increasing power generation capacity at Bhakra Dam and added irrigation waters for the states of Punjab and Haryana. The project was approved in 1963 and commissioned in 1977.

The Pandoh Dam is an embankment dam on the Beas River in Mandi district of Himachal Pradesh, India. Under the Beas Project, the dam was completed in 1977 and its primary purpose is hydroelectric power generation. Part of a run-of-the-river power scheme, it diverts the waters of the Beas to the southwest through a 38 km (24 mi) long system of tunnels and channels. The water is used for power generation at the Dehar Power House before being discharged into the Sutlej River, connecting both rivers. The power house has an installed capacity of 990 MW. The system diverts 256 cumecs (9000 cusecs) of Beas waters to the Satluj River. The project was completed in 1977.

History

The two major rivers Beas and Satluj flow out of the himalayas and reach a point where they are separated by a crow fly distance of approximately 36 km and have an elevation difference of approximately 1099 ft. The waters of Beas are continuous flow from ice-melt and flow throughout the year. This was realized and a plan made to exploit the potential of this river system. The power potential was estimated as 1,000 MW. The plans originally called Beas Project Unit - I Beas Satluj Link Project went through several revisions for diverting the waters of Beas river. The first plan prepared by Punjab Irrigation Department in 1957. The 1957 plan contemplated a diversion dam at Pandoh, 11.26-kilometre (7.00 mi) tunnel, 19.31-kilometre (12.00 mi) open channel, 4.82-kilometre (3.00 mi) tunnel. The 1957 report was followed by a 1960 report and the final proposal in 1961. The final proposal included 76.25-metre (250.2 ft) diversion dam at Pandoh, a 7.62-metre (25.0 ft) dia, 13.11-kilometre (8.15 mi) Pandoh baggi tunnel, 11.8-kilometre (7.3 mi) Sunder Nagar hydel channel, 8.53-metre (28.0 ft) dia, 12.35-kilometre (7.67 mi) Sundernagar Satluj tunnel, 22.86-metre (75.0 ft) dia 125-metre (410 ft) high surge shaft, three Dehar penstocks split to six penstocks and Dehar power plant with 6 x 165 MW generators. The system would divert 9,000 cubic feet per second (250 m3/s) of the Beas to the Satluj. An added benefit of the project was the increased inflow to Gobind Sagar thereby increasing power generation capacity at Bhakra Dam and added irrigation waters for the states of Punjab and Haryana. The project was approved in 1963 and commissioned in 1977.

About Manali

Manali is a Valley nestled in the mountains of the Indian state of Himachal Pradesh near the northern end of the Kullu Valley, at an altitude of 2,050 m (6,726 ft) in the Beas River Valley. It is located in the Kullu district, about 270 km (168 mi) north of the state capital, Shimla, 309 km (192 miles) northeast of Chandigarh and 544 km (338 miles) northeast of Delhi, the federal capital. The small town, with a population of 8,096, is the beginning of an ancient trade route to Ladakh and from there over the Karakoram Pass on to Yarkand and Khotan in the Tarim Basin. It is a popular tourist destination and serves as the gateway to Lahaul & Spiti district as well as Leh.

History

Manali is named after the Sanatan Hindu lawgiver Manu. The name Manali is regarded as the derivative of 'Manu-Alaya' which literally means 'the abode of Manu'. Legend has it that sage Manu stepped off his ark in Manali to recreate human life after a great flood had deluged the world. Manali lies in the North of Kullu Valley. The valley is often referred to as the 'Valley of the Gods'. Old Manali village has an ancient temple dedicated to sage Manu. The British introduced apple trees in the area. The first apple orchard was set up by the British near Patlikuhl, prior to this no Apple trees grew in the area. To this day, apple—along with plum and pear—remain the best source of income for the majority of inhabitants. Both Rainbow and Brown Trout was also introduced into the rivers and streams of the area by the colonisers. Before other luminaries started visiting Manali, the Indian nation's first Prime Minister Pt. Jawaharlal Nehru favoured this as a holiday destination in the mountains. With the increase in disposable incomes and somewhat owing to the rise of disturbances in Kashmir in the late 1980s, Manali witnessed a surge in tourist traffic. This once quiet village was transformed into a bustling town with numerous homestays as well as the occasional luxury boutique hotel and spa. During the warmer summer months, cafes and restaurants can be seen doing brisk business.

About Delhi

The Indian capital city of Delhi has a long history, and has been an important political centre of India as the capital of several empires. Much of Delhi's ancient history finds no record and this may be regarded as a lost period of its history. Extensive coverage of Delhi's history begins with the onset of the Delhi Sultanatein the 12th century. Since then, Delhi has been the centre of a succession of mighty empires and powerful kingdoms, making Delhi one of the longest serving Capitals and one of the oldest inhabited cities in the world. It is considered to be a city built, destroyed and rebuilt several times, as outsiders who successfully invaded the Indian Subcontinent would ransack the existing capital city in Delhi, and those who came to conquer and stay would be so impressed by the city's strategic location as to make it their capital and rebuild it in their own way. The core of Delhi's tangible heritage is Hindu, Islamic (spanning over seven centuries of Islamic rule over the city) with expansive British-era architecture inLutyens' Delhi dating to the British rule in India. Significant prehistoric sites in Delhi include Anangpur (in the Badarpur region), as well as Harappan excavations near Narela and Nand Nagari. References to Delhi's history in ancient literature are based on myths and legends. According to the Hindu epic Mahabharata, a city called Indraprastha, “City of the God Indra”, was the capital of the Pandavas. There is a strong belief that Purana Qila was built over the site of ancient Indraprastha. Northern Black Polished Ware (c700-200 BC) have been excavated at the site, and pieces of Painted Grey Ware were found on the surface, suggesting an even older settlement, possibly going back to ca. 1000 B.C. In 1966, an inscription of the Mauryan Emperor Ashoka (273-236 BC) was discovered near Srinivaspur. Two sandstone pillars inscribed with the edicts of Ashoka were brought to by Firuz Shah Tughluq in the 14th century. The famous Iron pillar near the Qutub Minar was commissioned by the emperor Kumara Gupta I of the Gupta dynasty (320-540) and transplanted to Delhi during the 10th century.

India Gate {Delhi}

The 42 metre high, free standing arch, popularly known as India Gate, was designed by Luytens and built in 1911. It was originally called All India War Memorial in memory of the 90,000 Soldiers of the Indian Army who died in World War I. The names of the soldiers are inscribed all along the walls of the arch. In1971, an eternal flame was lit here to honour the Amar Jawan (immortal soldiers).

Lotus Temple {Delhi}

It is a very recent architectural marvel of the Bahai faith. The Bahá'í Faith is the youngest of the world's independent religions. Its founder, Bahá'u'lláh (1817-1892), is regarded  by Bahá'ís as the most recent in the line of Messengers of God that stretches back beyond recorded time and that includes Abraham, Moses, Buddha, Zoroaster, Christ and Muhammad. The central theme of Bahá'u'lláh's message is that humanity is one single race and that the day has come for its unification in one global society. God, Bahá'u'lláh said, has set in motion historical forces that are breaking down traditional barriers of race, class, creed, and nation and that will, in time, give birth to a universal civilization..

Qutub Minar {Delhi}

The Qutub Minar made of red sandstone rising to the height of 72.5mts is an architectural marvel of the 13th century. Also a must is the visit to Ashoka Pillar dating back to the 5th century. Though made of iron it has with stood the weathers of time. A very interesting belief is assigned to this pillar- Stand with your back to the pillar, and if you can hold your hands around it, then make a wish and it will surely come true. Try it. You don't have to an archaeologist to find out about the past of your country. Simply visiting historic monuments helps you to understand it &can also lead you to grab some useful information, you never realized before.

The Red Fort {Delhi}

Built by the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan between 1638 and 1648, the masterpiece of Red Fort has the distinction of being chosen as a site from where the prime minister of India addresses the nation on the Independence Day. Popular as Lal Quila, the grand and imposing fort is today a regular haunt of tourists from all parts of the world. The unparalleled architecture is testimony to the grandness of supremacy of Mughal empire in India. The complex houses Diwan-i-Am, Diwan-i-Khas, the Moti Masjid, the Shahi Burj etc. The fort stands as dignified and grandiose as it did centuries ago.

The famous Humayun's Tomb {Delhi}

Delhi is the first garden tomb in India. A complex commissioned in 1562 CE by Hamida Banu Begum Humayun's wife and designed by Mirak Mirza a Persian architect this monument is one of the first specimens of Mughal architecture in the Indian subcontinent. Located on the banks of the River Yamuna this structure was declared a UNESCO Heritage site in 1993. The famous Humayun's Tomb of Delhi is considered to be the precursor of the 'Taj Mahal' as far as the architectural structure is concerned. It represents the Mughal style of architecture at its best. One of the major attractions in the city this mausoleum serves as the burial ground of several Mughals apart from the emperor himself. The Humayun's Tomb is a magnificent piece of architecture that took almost 9 years to complete with an expenditure of nearly one and a half million rupees. The mausoleum is a 140 feet high structure with a central dome. The double-layered dome has a white marble exterior but the rest of the tomb is made of red sandstone, with white marble ornamentation. Built over acres of lush green land and surrounded by fountains this complex is home to a well manicured garden, a beautiful mosque and several other tombs. This monument in Delhi attracts people from Indian and all corners of the globe.Temple is built in marble and red sandstone, symbolising devotion and eternal peace

Rickshaw ride {Delhi}

 Enjoy a cycle rikshaw ride at Chandni Chowk .More evidences of the anc  ient times that once existed in old Delhi can be found out by winding through the labyrinthine lanes of Chandni Chowk in a rickshaw. The pleasure associated with the rickshaw ride here is ultimate. The rickshaw rides gives the passengers an opportunity to see a different prospective of Chandni Chowk, which is otherwise only regarded as one of the favourite shopping avenues of Delhi.

Jama Masjid {Delhi}

The Masjid-i Jahān-Numā  the 'World-reflecting Mosque'), commonly known as the Jama Masjid  of Delhi, is the principal mosque of Old Delhi in India. Commissioned by the Mughal Empero r Shah Jahan, builder of the Taj Mahal,in the year 1650 CE and completed in the year 1656 AD, it is the largest and best-known mosque in India. It lies at the beginning of the Chawri Bazar Road, a very busy central street of Old Delhi.The later name, Jama Masjid, refers to the weekly Friday noon congregation prayers of Muslims, Jummah, which are usually done in a mosque, the "congregational mosque" or "jāmi' masjid". The courtyard of the mosque can hold up to twenty-five thousand worshippers. The mosque also houses several relics in a closet in the north gate, including an antique copy of the Qur'an written on deer skin.

Rashtrapati Bhavan {Delhi}

The Rashtrapati Bhavan pronunciation (help·info), "Presidential Residence") is the official home of the President of India, located in New Delhi, Delhi, India. It may refer to only the mansion (the 340-room main building) that has the President's official residence, halls, guest rooms and offices; it may also refer to the entire 130 hectare (320 acre) President Estate that additionally includes huge presidential gardens (Mughal Gardens), large open spaces, residences of bodyguards and staff, stables, other offices and utilities within its perimeter walls. The main palace building was formerly known as Viceroy's House. In terms of area, was the largest residence of a Head of State in the world. Now the largest presidential house is in Turkey.

Akshardham Temple {Delhi}

Akshardham or Swaminarayan Akshardham complex is a Hindu mandir, and a spiritual-cultural campus in New Delhi, India. Also referred to as Akshardham Temple or Swaminarayan Akshardham, the complex displays millennia of traditional Hindu and Indian culture, spirituality, and architecture. The temple, which attracts approximately 70 percent of all tourists who visit Delhi, was officially opened on 6 November 2005 by Dr. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam. It sits near the banks of the Yamuna adjacent to the 2010 Commonwealth Games village in eastern New Delhi. The temple, at the centre of the complex, was built according to the Vastu shastra and Pancharatra shastra. The complex features an Abhisheka Mandap, Sahaj Anand water show, a thematic garden and three exhibitions namely Sahajanand Darshan (Hall of Values), Neelkanth Darshan (an IMAX film on the early life of Swaminarayan as the teenage yogi, Neelkanth), and Sanskruti Darshan (cultural boat ride). According to Swaminarayan Hinduism, the word Akshardham means the abode of almighty Lord Swaminarayan and believed by followers as a temporal home of God on earth.